Computing

Computing

ONLINE SAFETY

At Brookfield, we believe online safety is of utmost importance. Online Safety is taught discretely in the Autumn term throughout all year groups, using guidance from the ‘Education for a Connected World’ Framework. This Framework has been built upon by the Trust to incorporate lessons and resources from Thinkuknow, Common Sense Media and the Google ‘Be Internet Legends’ Scheme for KS2. This ensures that children are given the knowledge and understanding to work safely, responsibly, and with a healthy approach to technology throughout the rest of the school year. Within this framework, children are taught to be aware of the 4 main risks involved in using the internet, often referred to as the 4C’s.


Content: being exposed to illegal, inappropriate, or harmful material
Contact: being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users
Conduct: personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes, harm
Commerce: these are risks such as online gambling, inappropriate advertising, and financial scams. 

 

COMPUTING AND DIGITAL SKILLS CURRICULUM 

In addition to our online safety provision, digital skills are a key part of our approach to teaching and learning, not just part of the computing curriculum. Digital literacy is necessary for children to demonstrate their ability to become digital citizens; individuals responsible for how they use technology to interact with the world around them. Whilst most pupils may be adept at using digital tools (quick swipes, open browsers, play games, watch videos) through passive use, their understanding of what these tools can do actively as a learning tool is often limited. We aim to shift our pupils from being ‘passive users’ of technology to ‘active users’ of technology. Technology enables pupil-driven choice and differentiation in the kind of work they create for sharing their learning and understanding such as video, audio, or written stories. 

Using technology is great to help us learn. However, effective use of them comes when we know the digital skills to utilise them. Knowing how to access, what to click on, how to use an app, tips, shortcuts, and more advanced levels make it easier and quicker so you spend more time learning than just trying to work out how to get on to the device. At Brookfield, we believe that the digital skills curriculum should be embedded as part of everyday teaching and learning, rather than taught stand-alone. It is something that is constantly changing and evolving.